E-zine Questionnaire

Below are the results of a questionnaire circulated to various e-zine editors last year, as preparation for two articles about e-zines for the PN Review. The PN Review is a small but prestigious print-based literary magazine from the UK, edited by Michael Schmidt and published by Carcanet. They are currently running a series of articles, written by me, about hyperliterature.

The first of these articles ("Hyperliterature - the web as a text") was published at the end of 2001. The second, "Marketing the Intangible - literary e-zines and their profitability" was published in Jan-Feb 2002.

Responses

In the true spirit of hyperliterature, I have randomised the links below using Javascript. If your browser doesn't support Javascript, you can read them in a fixed sequence by scrolling all the way down the page.























From John Tranter, Jacket magazine:

1. When did you launch your e-zine?

October 1997.

2. Are there any other e-zines which influenced you at the outset, or have influenced you since?

No.

3. Why did you decide to bring out an e-zine rather than a traditional magazine? What do you see as the main differences between the two?

Please see The Left Hand of Capitalism.

4. How many issues do you bring out per year?

I used to bring out four per year; since issue 12 in October 2000 I've published "three or four" per year.

5. What is your policy regarding back-issues - are they readily available from your main site, or do you wipe the slate clean and start again?

They're all there, permanently, with a search engine. No other kind of publishing can promise that.

6. Do you place any limit on the length (in words or lines) of contributions, or on the number of contributions per writer, or on the number of pages per issue?

No, other than commonsense. David Hess's piece on Barrtett Watten in Jacket 12 is about fifty pages long because it's worth it; most reviews or essays vary form two pages to about twelve. Here's David Hess's piece.

7. Do you make any money from the e-zine or receive any financial support, or is all work on it done on a purely voluntary basis?

Limited financial support (paying the Internet bills) from the business my wife and I own, Australian Literary Management.

Otherwise all labour, working time and equipment is donated voluntarily. (And so are all contributions.)

8. How many people work on the e-zine, and how do you divide up the work?

I was getting by with five people for a while there, but the load got too heavy and I expanded to ten:

9. Do you hope to make money (or more money) in the future? If you were to do so, what would be your priority - payments to contributors, or payments to yourself and other members of staff?

No; I can't see it ever happening.

10. Do you think literary e-zines will ever be profitable enterprises, and if so, how will the money be made?

No.

11. How do you publicize your e-zine, or does it publicize itself?

It's mainly word of mouth, and the Internet is good for that. Also, I send out announcements of new issues to a group of people mainly by email. I mention it occasionally on Internet poetry discussion groups such as British-Poets, PoetryEtc, and the Buffalo list at SUNY Buffalo's EPC cite. Occasionally a journalist will ask me for an interview: see Time Australia's piece.

12. What is your policy about adding links to other sites? Do you vet them?

Yes.

Do you only carry links to certain types of site?

Literary sites including magazines and small presses and discussion lists, research sites, sites that provide help to those wanting to design Internet pages, bookstores around the world, and so forth.

Do you categorize them?

In a broad general way, as follows:

Do you only carry links to sites which you like, do you have a list of favourites, or do you prefer not to discriminate?

I carry about a hundred links. I don't carry links to sites that I dislike.

13. Any other comments?

For general background on Jacket, please see The Left Hand of Capitalism.

best wishes,

J T

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From Paul Hardacre, papertiger:

When did you launch your e-zine?

The papertiger #01 CDROM was released in April 2001. A support web site containing submission, subscription, and other details, together with samples of poetry in p.t. #01, was launched at the same time.

Are there any other e-zines which influenced you at the outset, or have influenced you since?

The only ezines which influenced the production of papertiger would be the US poetry webzine Slope, in terms of its high quality content, and high quality design. I wanted the papertiger CDROM and web site interfaces to be of a similar quality. Too often poetry web sites and even print poetry journals suffer due to poor design. I wanted to produce something on CDROM to match journals of the standard of [the Australian journals] Heat and Meanjin, whilst offering audio and video poetry.

Why did you decide to bring out an e-zine rather than a traditional magazine? What do you see as the main differences between the two?

I decided to publish on CDROM firstly, because nobody here in Australia was doing it, and it seemed like an obvious gap in the provision of poetry. I know a lot of people without web access - or at least regular/reliable web access - and some people who arenít savvy even with things like email or web. But everyone with a computer will pretty much have a CDROM drive, so that was one thing.

Also, the idea of adding to the growing legion of poetry web sites didnít turn me on. Web seems so transient to me sometimes, and you can never really possess or own or collect, at least in a traditional sense, a web zine. I like to collect stuff like CDs, books, journals, and I know that for me personally web always seems like a second-rate cousin compared to these formats. And with CDROM it seemed like a nice enough blend of print and web - you can buy it, own it, hold it, put it on your shelf and all that, and yet you still get to enjoy the multimedia benefits of an ezine like Quicktime video and .mp3 audio poetry.

Finally, CDROM publishing, and distribution is cheap compared to print, which was a welcome bonus.

How many issues do you bring out per year?

We publish one issue of papertiger annually, and are currently expanding our list to include anthology projects and individual poetry collections. First is the Subversions: Generations of Contemporary Poetry CDROM anthology, which showcases the work of local, national, and international poets who have performed at the Subverse: Queensland Poetry Festival since its inception in 1997. The web site will have news about other titles.

What is your policy regarding back-issues - are they readily available from your main site, or do you wipe the slate clean and start again?

Back issues are available as long as we have stock in supply. Our print run for each CDROM is currently 500. If we ran out of stock and there was enough demand, weíd certainly consider another print run.

Do you place any limit on the length (in words or lines) of contributions, or on the number of contributions per writer, or on the number of pages per issue?

No length or line limits for poetry in papertiger. Submissions are assessed with quality as a foremost consideration.

Poets are welcome to submit as often as they wish, with a maximum of four poems per submission.

Some poets had three or four poems published in papertiger #01 - one poet featured strongly with seven pieces - and many others had just the one.

We work to a format of 100 poems or screens of poetry per issue, comprised from the work of almost 70 international poets. Seven of these poems were .mp3 audio poems (with text accompaniment) and two were Quicktime video. We also consider Flash animated poems, etc.

Do you make any money from the e-zine or receive any financial support, or is all work on it done on a purely voluntary basis?

At the moment Iím still working to the point of covering costs - with the main cost being licenced software (Macromedia Director 8.0 cost A$2,200.00), ongoing web hosting for the site - actual production of the CDROM units is quite cheap. papertiger is an entirely self-funded small business, barely 12 months old. We received no external funding, and the team members (Contributing Editors, Designer, and myself as Editor) donít get paid, and that hasnít really been a major goal to be honest, even though it would be nice. I am fortunate enough to have a well-paying job, and the time and the commitment to publish other peoplesí work - thatís just how it is. The designer is my partner, Marissa (who is a professional web designer), and she is happy to donate her skills to the project.

How many people work on the e-zine, and how do you divide up the work?

The papertiger team is:

Contributing Editors act as reps for papertiger in their region, coordinate and encourage submissions from poets whose work is identifiable with papertiger Editorial Position, offer editorial advice and recommendations regarding the work of poets from the particular region, promote papertiger through poetry networks, and encourage subscriptions. Final editorial decisions rest with the Editor and Assistant Editor, who also do handle administration, liaison, marketing, etc. Design of both the CDROM and the web site rests with the Designer.

Do you hope to make money (or more money) in the future? If you were to do so, what would be your priority - payments to contributors, or payments to yourself and other members of staff?

Of course I hope to make some money in the future, although as I said itís not the end of the world if we donít. Priority would be contributors first and foremost, then Designer and Contributing Editors. If anything was left then Brett (Assistant Ed) and I could squabble over it.

Do you think literary e-zines will ever be profitable enterprises, and if so, how will the money be made?

Hard question to answer. I really donít see how they will be, unless people are willing to subscribe to them like a print journal, and Iím not sure that people are willing to do that. Web just isnít something that people really will part money for, for the time being. E-books and d-books (print on demand) on the other hand, are something that people will pay for, because they can download them and then own them, to enjoy whenever they like. CDROM is kinda the same - once you buy it, itís yours, always. I think that the e- and d-book sector particularly will be a growth area in publishing. If you subscribe to your web journal you might not be able to read it when you want (depending on your connection, server, ISP, etc), and people will not pay for that.

How do you publicise your e-zine, or does it publicise itself?

Publicity for papertiger is through ads in print poetry mags, links on poetry web sites, direct emailing to my poetry contacts, listings like the annual Bookman Writersí Marketplace, online listings, mentions on sites like About.com, print articles and reviews here in Australia, the networks of the papertiger Contributing Editors, etc.

What is your policy about adding links to other sites? Do you vet them? Do you only carry links to certain types of site? Do you categorise them? Do you only carry links to sites which you like, do you have a list of favourites, or do you prefer not to discriminate?

The link has to be poetry specific, and must be to a site of some quality. Links on the papertiger site are categorised into print journals, ezines, publishers, cyberpoetry, and ezines. We are open to any requests to link, but have to like what we are linking to. At the end of the day it really is a matter of deciding whether or not itís a link we want to be associated with.

Any other comments?

None. Except make sure you send me a copy of the finished article! Or at least where I can read it. What is the P N Review? Is it print or electronic? Please tell.

Thanks,

Paul

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From Sharon Shahan, Samsara Quarterly:

1. When did you launch your e-zine?

March 2000

2. Are there any other e-zines which influenced you at the outset, or have influenced you since?

In the beginning I was very much inspired by many different sites, but in particular I'd say BOLD TYPE.

3. Why did you decide to bring out an e-zine rather than a traditional magazine? What do you see as the main differences between the two?

To the first question, pretty much cost. The differences are (for me) with print, you can take it out for a walk, read it in bed or cozy on the couch, it feels better between the fingers than a monitor. E-zines are affordable, easily accessible and perhaps less time consuming.

4. How many issues do you bring out per year?

Samsara is a quarterly zine and so far, we've been able to pump her out on schedule.

5. What is your policy regarding back-issues - are they readily available from your main site, or do you wipe the slate clean and start again?

This is a sore in my side! I am still working on archives! I was wiping clean and starting again and hated myself for it. But the reasons were simple, I was computer ignorant, I'm on borrowed space and it was very time consuming. Now, I know how to work around all that HTML jazz and am trying to put together a simple index page where folks can come in, see a poet, click and go read their work.

6. Do you place any limit on the length (in words or lines) of contributions, or on the number of contributions per writer, or on the number of pages per issue?

Limits on length, no. I do ask that contributors for poetry keep it to one submission of six poems per month. I don't have a limit on pages per issue. I tend to go with where the issue takes me.

7. Do you make any money from the e-zine or receive any financial support, or is all work on it done on a purely voluntary basis?

Volunteer!

8. How many people work on the e-zine, and how do you divide up the work?

Myself and Suzanne Frischkorn, who is my associate editor. I try to have at least one guest editor per issue. (sometimes, we're much luckier and have two!) We don't divide work up per say, I simply make first cuts and send works to the editors for their comments. We then collaborate over the works we've liked and make final selections from them.

9. Do you hope to make money (or more money) in the future? If you were to do so, what would be your priority - payments to contributors, or payments to yourself and other members of staff?

Of course it would rock if we were making money! My first priority would be to pay contributors, after all!

10. Do you think literary e-zines will ever be profitable enterprises, and if so, how will the money be made?

I'm not sure how to answer this question and I'm not real certain I have an interest in trying to make it 'profitable' --it (for me) makes the whole art deal a bit of an unattractive whore!

11. How do you publicize your e-zine, or does it publicize itself?

I have a newsletter list and try to post on boards, etc., when a new issue is out. I also try to keep my site updated in search engines. Word of mouth works well too.

12. What is your policy about adding links to other sites? Do you vet them? Do you only carry links to certain types of site? Do you categorize them? Do you only carry links to sites which you like, do you have a list of favourites, or do you prefer not to discriminate?

I discriminate my exchanges. There are sites I adore and totally dig it that we exchange links. It's like poetry, poets support poets, sites support sites. I try to keep it to a minimal though because I don't want my links page to be over extended.

13. Any other comments?

Other than, hey stop by for a visit? (talk about whoring!)

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From NicoLe sativa kurlish for supralurid: a miscellany of arts and communication.

1. When did you launch your e-zine?

I believe the first issue made it out in April 2000.

2. Are there any other e-zines which influenced you at the outset, or have influenced you since?

Stirring, certainly. I've always wanted to publish my own magazine. Erin (Erin Elizabeth, editor of Stirring - Ed) got me up and moving with the idea of Sundress Publications. And I was encouraged by how well she was doing with her e-zine. Since then, Samsara has influenced me. Sharon's style/taste encourages me to do my own thing even more.

3. Why did you decide to bring out an e-zine rather than a traditional magazine? What do you see as the main differences between the two?

Well, mine is a traditional magazine also. That's what I wanted: my baby in print, tangible. But I've put stuff on the web too because I know I'll reach a much larger audience that way. It's part marketing, showing people a sample of what they'll get in the print issue, and it's part supplement for the people who do get the print edition, and it's part just giving people something to read.

The big differences, as I see them, is that doing the print zine, for me, is much more challenging and rewarding. It gives me more of a sense of having my own publication. I like having something to hold, to say "Look, this is what I do." The e-zines, however, reach a much larger audience, and can be much more interactive. I guess I want the best of both worlds.

4. How many issues do you bring out per year?

Last year, there were only two, as there will probably be only two this year also. I intended to do a quarterly mag, but I just haven't been able to keep up with this. I'm planning on doing some in-between net-only issues.

5. What is your policy regarding back-issues - are they readily available from your main site, or do you wipe the slate clean and start again?

I've got back issues available on the site, and in print. My problem has been making the html for the two compatible. I'm working on that ;} That should be fixed by the third issue.

6. Do you place any limit on the length (in words or lines) of contributions, or on the number of contributions per writer, or on the number of pages per issue?

Pages per issue, certainly. We can only fit so much in the print zine right now. If we change format, we might be able to hold more, but we can't afford to change format. Also, we try to keep each person's contributions to two pages (print) per piece. (Two pages in the zine are equal to one side of a standard 8 1/2 x 11 sheet of paper.) We had started out with the idea of taking only one piece per person, but in the second issue, several people had two or three pieces. I've even considered featuring an artist for an issue. It honestly depends on the quality of our submissions.

7. Do you make any money from the e-zine or receive any financial support, or is all work on it done on a purely voluntary basis?

Make money? Well, I charge $3/$4 for the print zine. Trying to cover the cost of printing. I don't make any profit. Maybe eventually we will. I would love to make a profit so that we could hold a contest with a monetary prize without requiring entry fees. I hate contest entry fees.

8. How many people work on the e-zine, and how do you divide up the work?

Right now, there are two of us. I do the poetry, rejection and acceptance letters, layout, printing, have final say on everything. Keith works on the prose, does most of the technical editing/proofreading, helps with the poetry.

9. Do you hope to make money (or more money) in the future? If you were to do so, what would be your priority - payments to contributors, or payments to yourself and other members of staff?

I would love to make a profit. I would first like to pay contibutors, hold a contest. Eventually, I would love it if Supralurid were fully self-sustaining, and might even allow me to not have to keep another job, but I really doubt that will ever happen. But who knows.

10. Do you think literary e-zines will ever be profitable enterprises, and if so, how will the money be made?

Maybe. Sundress has considered selling other products like poetry calendars or postcards. I really don't know.

11. How do you publicize your e-zine, or does it publicize itself?

I'm not very good at tooting my own horn. Being a part of Sundress helps because Stirring draws in a lot of readers. Stirring had a large readership before Sundress was even formed. I go to poetry readings/festivals with Supralurid in hand. When someone says "hey, I want one" right now, I'm giving out copies of the first two issues. I'm not as good at the marketing as I'd like to be.

12. What is your policy about adding links to other sites? Do you vet them? Do you only carry links to certain types of site? Do you categorize them? Do you only carry links to sites which you like, do you have a list of favourites, or do you prefer not to discriminate?

Right now, we don't have a "links" section. I'm leaving that to the Sundress main site. I will carry links for contributors' web sites, as well as links relevant to the issue's content. There are links to get around Sundress. That's about it. I try to keep the links really relevant. If you want to know what I'm reading, check out my links page on my personal site (which isn't actually there right now cuz my page is in a state of flux...).

13. Any other comments?

No. But feel free to ask if you have any other questions :}

*snowflakes*

--nicoLe, editor and such.

supralurid@sundress.net

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From Ethan Panquin, Slope:

When did you launch your e-zine?

Slope, the online literary journal, was launched in November 1999.

Are there any other e-zines which influenced you at the outset, or have influenced you since?

I admired (and still do) the excellent content of Jacket. In terms of the way ďe-zinesĒ were designed, I was less than impressed. Thatís why I began Slope; to fuse great content and great design. The web is a visual entity, after all. Today I admire NowCulture.com greatly - theyíre pushing online journals in a new direction, with really slick graphics and challenging work.

Why did you decide to bring out an e-zine rather than a traditional magazine? What do you see as the main differences between the two?

I chose to create a web zine because, as business people say, the market was right. I knew I had the ability to fill a hole in the market (literary journals online), and to do it right.

The main difference is I donít have to worry about distribution, sales, circulation. Bang - choose the best work, let my designers (76design.com) have a go at it, and weíre all set.

How many issues do you bring out per year?

Slope is a bi-monthly journal.

What is your policy regarding back-issues - are they readily available from your main site, or do you wipe the slate clean and start again?

Back issues are available from the main site.

Do you place any limit on the length (in words or lines) of contributions, or on the number of contributions per writer, or on the number of pages per issue?

2 to 6 poems, any length. Slope is pretty limitless - if the quality of the work is of the highest calibre in our editorial estimation, we use it.

Do you make any money from the e-zine or receive any financial support, or is all work on it done on a purely voluntary basis?

Slope is a nonprofit venture that receives no support. It is paid for out-of-pocket. Neither editors or contributors receive payment.

How many people work on the e-zine, and how do you divide up the work?

I edit the journal, my Australia editor Michael Farrellís been a real force for Slope for the past year, and we just increased the staff to include a Canada editor (Derek Webster, formerly of Boulevard); a contributing editor (Peter Johnson, editor of The Prose Poem); and managing editors, Chris Janke (east coast) and Pamela Burdak (west coast).

Do you hope to make money (or more money) in the future? If you were to do so, what would be your priority - payments to contributors, or payments to yourself and other members of staff?

Yes, we hope to make money - to pay for production of the magazine, first and foremost. To be able to take it in new directions that we canít travel in at this time due to lack of funds.

Do you think literary e-zines will ever be profitable enterprises, and if so, how will the money be made?

Online literary magazines will eventually charge for subscriptions, the same as any print journal or newspaper. The technology that can allow this to happen is here; editors just need to realize the earning potential they have. Again, if money was put into producing the magazines rather than padding pockets, Iíd think this no threat to the energy and vitality and independent spirit of most online journals. (Slope, by the way, has no plans to do this.)

How do you publicize your e-zine, or does it publicize itself?

Slope is primarily a word-of-mouth enterprise - never has a print ad of any kind run, and weíve accumulated more than 600,000 hits. Listservs and e-mailing lists provide the only ďpublicity.Ē It has established a good reputation, and good visibility, in the poetry community, so word spreads fast.

What is your policy about adding links to other sites? Do you vet them? Do you only carry links to certain types of site? Do you categorize them? Do you only carry links to sites which you like, do you have a list of favourites, or do you prefer not to discriminate?

I link to other print and online journals (the ones I know of) I respect, simply put. Sites with poor content and/or poor design wonít make the cut.

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From Marek Lugowski, Agnieszka's Dowry:

1. When did you launch your e-zine?

UNESCO International Day of the Woman, 1996 (March 8)

2. Are there any other e-zines which influenced you at the outset, or have influenced you since?

No. On the other hand, we are told we have influenced others and other sites' web design. :) For example, Jennifer Lay says she used our concept of rooms (subweb pages with mutually linked content) in her very beautiful The Astrophysicist's Tango Partner Speaks.

3. Why did you decide to bring out an e-zine rather than a traditional magazine? What do you see as the main differences between the two?

We did both. At first we weren't certain we could afford to mirror all of the online magazine in paper, but once we made commitment to doing so, we have done just that. If anything, it has made us even more judicious and finicky about hat we accept, knowing that we will have to later shell out money to print it all as chapbooks, and to maintain the chapbooks in print indefinitely, as is our policy. After each online issue closes, we prepare a chapbook that reflects it's alphabeticized by author textual content. The difference? Print costs a lot of money by comparison. And extra effort.

Our online magazine is at:

-=- Agnieszka's Dowry (AgD) ISSN 1088-4300 -=-

And the annotated catalog which includes the magazine volumes resides at:

-=- ASGP Catalog of Chapbooks -=-

4. How many issues do you bring out per year?

We describe ourselves as quasi-quarterly -- so less than 4 and more than 2, on average.

5. What is your policy regarding back-issues - are they readily available from your main site, or do you wipe the slate clean and start again?

The entire magazine, from day one, exists as a seamless online installation that we append to, rather than replace. When you visit us, you will see the oldsest stuff at the top of the welcoming page and the new, at the bottom. Sort of like a running tapestry. The rooms are the points of entry on it, or "pearls" floating above the textured background, sort of strewn around but in issue-inscreasing order.

And then, of course, there is the catalog of chapbooks, which indexes into the online rooms, by the way. So in a way, we give away the store.

6. Do you place any limit on the length (in words or lines) of contributions, or on the number of contributions per writer, or on the number of pages per issue?

We like to refrain from recycling the authors immediately. And of late, we rather discourage the ones we alreaady featured -- simply because of the 238 installations (one or more pieces featuring an author displayed as a unit) comprise 179 authors. We'd like to steer towards more author variety.

We have some rather long poems. For example, we reprinted Goblin Market by Christina Rossetti.

7. Do you make any money from the e-zine or receive any financial support, or is all work on it done on a purely voluntary basis?

Everything we do is done on a voluntery basis, but as we are a nonprofit corporation (A Small Garlic Press), we have to have a means of income. So we charge for our paper chapbooks.

8. How many people work on the e-zine, and how do you divide up the work?

Usually, katrina grace craig (in Seattle) and I, Marek Lugowski (in Chicago), are it. Our last issue was a special American haiku issue, and we asked our webmaster who is a haikuist, Jen Jensen, to guest-edit it. There are 2 other individuals comprising A Small Garlic Press.

9. Do you hope to make money (or more money) in the future? If you were to do so, what would be your priority - payments to contributors, or payments to yourself and other members of staff?

If our income ever allows it, it would be nice to pay contributors. They get free copies of the chapbook that their contribution resides in.

10. Do you think literary e-zines will ever be profitable enterprises, and if so, how will the money be made?

Yes, probably, and the usual way -- advertising, subscriptions. Making profit was not a design issue of ours, obviously, since we incorporated as a nonprofit, which actually put a lot of strictures on us.

11. How do you publicize your e-zine, or does it publicize itself?

We indexed it to the best of our ability in various search engines, and from that point on, it sort of mushroomed by reference. It probably helps to have it in the dmoz.org Web Directory, which itself is staffed by volunteers. Agnieszka's Dowry (AgD) shows up prominently there, under Magazines. Then again, the prominence reflects the popularity of the magazine among referring sites, so it all feeds on itself.

12. What is your policy about adding links to other sites? Do you vet them? Do you only carry links to certain types of site? Do you categorize them? Do you only carry links to sites which you like, do you have a list of favourites, or do you prefer not to discriminate?

We are discerning about it. We treat the links page, which is actually outside the magazine itself and belongs to the web site of A Small Garlic Press, as editorial content. Yes, we categorize them. We want the page to be a resource and a good departure point for surfing the web.

13. Any other comments?

We handcoded all the html; made it conform to W3C's Valid HTML 4.0 or 4.01, and we made sure that it is accessible by any browser, including the olds ones, and especially conveninetly and informatively by the textual browser Lynx, which makes going through the entire magazine a breeze. So in that sense, the magazine is our web design teaching tool. It loads fast and takes up only so much screen area and the type is uniformly large throughout and everythging is searchable and all that.

-- Marek Lugowski

co-editor (with katrina grace craig)

Agnieszka's Dowry (AgD) ISSN 1088-4300

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From Rupert Loydell, Stride Magazine:

1. When did you launch your e-zine?

1999 [but stride magazine - on paper - started 1980]

2. Are there any other e-zines which influenced you at the outset, or have influenced you since?

tangents, mainly. and lots of other sites - mainly music and reviews rather than poetry ones!

3. Why did you decide to bring out an e-zine rather than a traditional magazine? What do you see as the main differences between the two?

unlimited space, low cost, more readers.

4. How many issues do you bring out per year?

i dont do the magazine as issues; i put new work up every 2 or 3 weeks and remove some older pieces into an archive at the website.

5. What is your policy regarding back-issues - are they readily available from your main site, or do you wipe the slate clean and start again?

see above.

6. Do you place any limit on the length (in words or lines) of contributions, or on the number of contributions per writer, or on the number of pages per issue?

yes: 5 or 6 poems per poetry submission, short prose only. no limits otherwise - in fact i welcome intelligent, lengthy reviews and articles

7. Do you make any money from the e-zine or receive any financial support, or is all work on it done on a purely voluntary basis?

no support, all voluntary, tho i see it as an adjunct to Stride's book publications.

8. How many people work on the e-zine, and how do you divide up the work?

editor + friend who is site manager.

9. Do you hope to make money (or more money) in the future? If you were to do so, what would be your priority - payments to contributors, or payments to yourself and other members of staff?

nope. one of the interesting thing about the web is how resistant it has been to making money from!

10. Do you think literary e-zines will ever be profitable enterprises, and if so, how will the money be made?

no.

11. How do you publicize your e-zine, or does it publicize itself?

flyers, links, words of mouth, listings etc.

12. What is your policy about adding links to other sites? Do you vet them? Do you only carry links to certain types of site? Do you categorize them? Do you only carry links to sites which you like, do you have a list of favourites, or do you prefer not to discriminate?

i have a set of links to sites i like.

13. Any other comments?

let me know when yr article appears please! good luck

Rupert Loydell, Stride

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